Grey, yellow, blue, pink, ivory, red… there are a million colours, and shades of colours to decorate your home with; from duck egg blue, to emerald green and everything in between.

Each colour has personal associations and preference. However, there is a psychology behind colours, colours can affect moods, so care is required with how they are used throughout the home. You’ll often find similar colours used in the same rooms time and time again… and for good reason.

Yellow

yellowYellow is well known to be a happy colour, it offers energy and as a warm tone can be very welcoming. As a welcoming colour it can often fit well within a hallway. However, care should be taken as the colour can very easily become overwhelming.

When used well, yellow not only brings a positive energy to a room but is also said to encourage communication, whilst being uplifting and illuminating, this lends itself well to being used in social spaces such as living rooms. The colour also accents well against soft tones and whites, therefore a great choice for soft furnishings and decorative items to inject a bit of colour to the room. Yellow is also said to inspire original thought and creativity, so would work well in an office space or study.

Be warned though, use in a nursery may not be advisable as studies show that babies cry more in yellow rooms.

Red

redRed has to be the marmite of the colour chart, as it forces a fairly strong opinion. Whilst it is the colour of love and passion, it is also incredibly bold. This makes it a great statement colour to be used sparingly throughout rooms to create a feature. Red is often favoured for use in dining rooms, and for good reasons, studies have shown it to be an appetite inducing colour, perhaps why it is so often found on crockery and dining accessories. As a warm colour it is also said to invoke conversation, ideal for dinner parties and welcoming new guests.

Green

green 2The colour of nature, green is the most calming and invigorating choice. It is a natural stress reliever and is said to relieve anxiety, making it a great choice to decorate your home with. Different shades are obviously available, from pastels, to navy and deep ivy green. Pastels are the most popular choice as they work well with yellow and white, creating a happy and calm environment.

As a calming colour it is suitable for use in all rooms but is often seen in bedrooms and living rooms to inspire a more mindful and healthy ambience.

White

white kitchenWhite is always going to be used in a home, but can so often appear clinical when overused. The best way to avoid this is to pair it with an accenting colour to infuse the room with an additional mood.

White itself is a colour of purity, fresh and new, so a great way to revitalise a room. It is also a colour of coolness and simplicity, creating a space that is uncluttered in decoration, allowing your personality to be added in other ways.

Blue

blue 3The colour of the ocean and sky, blue is synonymous with a sense of tranquility, creating a calming environment. This makes it a perfect choice for a bedroom and bathroom to create a cool, calm and collected space to relax in, it is said to invoke rest so is ideal for a good nights sleep.

Blue is also a colour which inspires intelligence and productivity, so would be a good choice for a home study or office area, though be careful as it also inspires rest… wouldn’t want you nodding off halfway through an essay!

Blue is best to be avoided in a dining area and isn’t often seen heavily used in kitchens, as whilst red increases an appetite, blue has the opposite effect and is said to supress an appetite. This is all down to how the colour affects you psychologically, which in turn has physical impacts in speeding up, or slowing down a metabolism, for which your appetite reacts accordingly.

pink 2Pink

Pink is a tricky one. It is stereotyped as a “sugar and spice and all things nice” colour, thoroughly feminine and overwhelming when used in excess. However, it has a soothing effect and is aesthetically pleasing. It is also a bit of a fashion statement at the moment, a quick search on pinterest and home styling websites will show a multitude of home décor examples with a dusky pink paired with copper and a light grey.

Beige

beige 2A colour that pours dread into many. Often associated with bland and boring, beige has had a bit of a comeback with the recent popularity of “ivory”.

It may not set the world on fire but is a dependable colour, a conservative choice if you want to play on the safe side. It’s also neutral, calming and relaxing and can add a sense of sophistication when used appropriately. Maybe it’s time to bring beige back.

 

If you would like to benefit from our local knowledge and years of experience of selling homes, feel free to contact your local branch for a conversation without obligation.

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